Artisans of a Great House

 

  • Artisans of a Great House
Ms. Betsy Greene – Decorative Painting

Saturday, January 26 from 10AM to noon

$50 per person/$40 Members

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For reservations, please call 410-263-4683×10 or email info@hammondharwoodhouse.org

 

In this hands on workshop series artisans explore the trades employed by families who lived in the great houses of the Chesapeake, like the Hammond-Harwood House. Skilled faux grain artisan Betsy Greene will take participants on a tour of the graining in the mansion and also talk about the work she did on the reproduction floor cloth in the entryway. After the tour there will be a faux graining workshop in the classroom where participants create a take home

Biography: Betsy Greene, Decorative painting

Betsy Greene was born and raised in Annapolis, MD. After graduating from Annapolis Sr. High, she studied fine art at St Mary’s College in Southern MD and the Md. Institute of Art in Baltimore. While living in Baltimore in the early 1980’s, she apprenticed to a furniture restorer, and through this connection, learned about the art of Decorative Painting. After a five year apprenticeship, Betsy went out on her own as a decorative painter and has been working as just that for the past 30 odd years. Along the way, mostly self taught, she has worked mostly in the Baltimore Washington area, and has also traveled to New York, Paris, and Miami, to ply her trade. The work has consisted of murals, painted furniture, floor cloths and a multitude of decorative finishes on every surface imaginable. She has also been commissioned paintings and mosaics. She has worked in many prestigious locations, including The Walters Art Museum, the Baltimore Museum of Art, The National Gallery of Art, as well as many private residences churches and commercial sites. She resides in Baltimore with her son and husband.

 

  • Artisans of a Great House
    Mr. Henry Hopkins III Silversmith

Saturday, July 28th,2018  10 am to noon.

$50 per person/$40 Members

For reservations call 410 263 46873 x 10 or email info@hammondharwoodhouse.org

 

In this hands on workshop series artisans explore the trades employed by families who lived in the great houses of the Chesapeake, like the Hammond-Harwood House. Second generation silversmith, Henry Hopkins III, has worked on silver for the White House, The Phillips Collection, and Homewood House. In this two hour long program Mr. Hopkins will take you on a tour of the silver collection of Hammond-Harwood House including the conservation methods he used on an 18th century urn and 19th century butter dish, both original to the house.

Biography: Henry Hopkins III, Silversmith

Baltimore MD.  Apprenticed to his father, Henry P Hopkins Jr., who started a silversmithing shop in a converted 1891 carriage house in the Mt. Vernon area of downtown Baltimore in 1950. Born in 1958, Henry III was taken to the studio as a child, later beginning to actually make very basic pieces at the age of 12 or 13. 2018 will be 40 years of his working, self-employed, in this studio, the last 30 with his father, who is now 100 years old, and retired.

He worked side by side with his father through high school and also while he was attending Maryland Institute College of Art, where he received a BFA in 1982. Through experience he gained the skills necessary to make and restore sterling silver, gold, and other metal items.

By watching and helping his father, he gained the necessary experience to make maces for Universities, Chalices, for churches, and Presidential Ensignia (large Sterling and gold necklaces worn by deans and presidents of Universities during graduations) as well as Baptismal fonts for churches here in MD and in several southern states.

Maces made by Henry III include University of Chicago, St Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore, and The College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia and Georgia. Sterling Silver Trophies for the Maryland Hunt Cup Steeplechase

Restoration of antique items and those of historic value include piece from:

The White House in Washington DC

Maryland Governor’s Mansion

Winterthur Museum

The Philips Collection (Franklin and Marshall)

Governor’s Mansion in Raleigh, NC

Hammond-Harwood House

Historic Annapolis

Maryland Historical Society Historical Society

Gibson Island Trophy Collection (over 150 pieces)

Maryland Jockey Club Horse Racing Trophies

US Naval Academy Trophies

 

  • Artisans of a Great House –Cancelled
    Mr. Drake Witte – Mason

Friday, October 19  at 2 p.m (Rescheduled from September 21)

For reservations, please call 410-263-4683×10 or email info@hammondharwoodhouse.org

 

In this hands on series artisans explore the trades employed by families who lived in the great houses of the Chesapeake, like the Hammond-Harwood House. Get up close with an expert mason to find brick patterns and discover the mortar that was used in the 18th century. Mason Drake Witte will take participants on a tour followed by a participatory workshop.

 

Biography: Drake Witte, Mason

Brick mason Drake Witte is a native of Hagerstown Maryland where he grew up in a 1750’s limestone Pennsylvania Bank Barn style home. Growing up his parents had a sailboat business in Annapolis. He developed an interest in history, sculpture, and philosophy. He started his first bricklayers job at age 19 in 1971 and continued on to become an apprentice bricklayer in Washington D.C. Drake has been self-employed since 1982 and has worked on many 18th century buildings including the John Ridout house, Hammond-Harwood House, and the orangery at Wye House on the eastern shore. He is a seasoned lecturer and has spoken at Historic Annapolis and Preservation Maryland among others. Drake has received several awards including the Preservation Lifetime Achievement Award from Historic Annapolis.