March

 

  • Full Moon Tour

Friday, March 2 at 6:30 pm

$20 per person/$15 Members

Buy Tickets

For reservations, please call 410-263-4683×10 or email info@hammondharwoodhouse.org

 

Night was a perilous time in early America as thieves, wayward travelers, and even evil spirits lurked around the corner for our early ancestors. Families engaged in a process of shutting in, barring the front door, and retreating to the inner sanctity of family life. Others chose to frequent taverns and frolic in the night, much to the distress of proper society. On this interactive tour visitors will learn about what night was like during the early 19th century when the beautiful Frances Townley Chase Loockerman lived on the property with her eccentric husband Richard and their young family. Visitors will hear about the rise and fall of this Annapolis family.

 

  • Exhibition opening “Architect and Apprentice

Thursday, March 29 from 6 pm to 8 pm. Opening remarks 6:30pm.

Exhibition opening for members. Wine and appetizers provided.

Please RSVP HERE , call 410-263-4683×10 or email info@hammondharwoodhouse.org

Exhibition runs April 1 to December 31.  Free and open to the public during normal tour hours,

Monday through Sunday noon to 5 pm, Tuesday closed.

For more information please CLICK HERE

Two hundred and seventy years ago fourteen year old William Buckland made the journey from his home city of Oxford, England to the bustling capital of London and ultimately into the pages of architectural history. Recognized as one of Colonial America’s premier 18th century architects, William Buckland’s crowning achievement was the Anglo-Palladian mansion he designed for Matthias Hammond in 1774.  Buckland poured over design books before ultimately choosing a design from 16th century Italian architect Andrea Palladio’s Four Books of Architecture, known as the Villa Pisani. He adapted the structure to fit the tastes and climate of 18th century Maryland. Today this structure stands as a testament of the architect’s ingenuity. Buckland never lived to see the final result. The implementation of Buckland’s design was carried out by an accomplished group of craftsmen including his young apprentice John Randall, who became Mayor of Annapolis, and Buckland’s skilled enslaved artisan by the name of Oxford. The exhibition focuses on the narrative of William Buckland and his relationships forged with apprentice and craftsmen.

 

To become a member please join here.